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Cave: Kaopectate reformulation contains aspirin-derivate
Kaopectate is a very popular over-the-counter diarrhea treatment for humans which is often also used in cats and dogs with and without recommendation of a veterinarian. The new Kaopectate´s formula contains bismuth subsalicylate, which may cause salicylate toxicosis in cats that are overdosed.

The `old` Kaopectate contained attapulgite, an inert clay aluminum.

Veterinarians have recommended Kaopectate off-label to treat diarrhea in cats and dogs, particularly for clients who are unable or unwilling to seek immediate veterinary care, AVMA officials say.

The range of recommended aspirin-derivative dosages that have been published for cats is 10 mg/kg every other day to 25 mg/kg every day, officials add.
A tablespoon of reformulated Kaopectate contains 130 mg aspirin equivalent, and extra-strength Kaopectate contains approximately 230 mg aspirin equivalent.
A tablespoon of extra-strength Kaopectate given to a 5-pound cat would yield approximately 100 mg/kg aspirin equivalent and would likely result in toxicosis, says Dr. Steve Hansen, a diplomate of the American Board of Veterinary Toxicology and director of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals` Animal Poison Control Center.

Salicylates should only be administered to cats under veterinary supervision. Some dogs are also sensitive to salicylates.

Source: Kaopectate reformulation poses danger to cats. In: DVM Newsmagazine January 1, 2004. www.dvmnewsmagazine.com/dvm/





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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Microbiota of traumatic, open fracture wounds and the mechanism of injury
Open fractures are characterized by disruption of the skin and soft tissue, which allows for microbial contamination and colonization. Preventing infection‐related complications of open fractures and other acute wounds remains an evolving challenge due to an incomplete understanding of how microbial colonization and contamination influence healing and outcomes. Culture‐independent molecular methods are now widely used to study human‐associated microbial communities without introducing culture biases. This recently online published study describes the fascinating association between the mechanism of injury and the microbiota of the wounds.

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