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lime sulphur or Malaseb Concentrate Rinse as topical therapy for feline dermatophytosis
Dermatophytosis is cats is a serious problem especially in shelters, and the therapy of choice includes oral itraconazole combined with topical antifungal rinses. Over the last years, Malaseb rinse (0,2% miconazole/0,2% chlorhexidine) has shown an excellent efficacy against Microsporum canis, the most common isolated fungus in feline dermatophytoses. Is it superior to the `classic`, cheap lime sulphur?

In an open non-randomized study, 90 cats with severe dermatophytosis were treated with 21 days of oral itraconazole at 10 mg/kg and one of three topical antifungal rinses applied twice weekly: lime sulphur (LSO); reformulated lime sulphur with an odour-masking agent (LSR); or a 0.2% miconazole nitrate and 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate rinse (MC).

Weekly examinations and fungal cultures were used to monitor the catsÂ’ response to therapy.

If at day 42 of treatment cats were still strongly fungal culture positive and/or developing new lesions, they were retreated with oral itraconazole and LSO.

Cats were not prevented from licking the solutions and none developed oral ulcerations.

Thirty-one cats were treated with LSO, 27 with LSR and 32 with MC.

The median number of days to cure was 30 (range 10–69 days) and 34 (range 23–80 days) for LSO and LSR, respectively.

Thirty-two cats were treated with MC, and 13 of 32 cats required repeat treatment because of persistent culture-positive status and development of new lesions.

Median number of days of treatment for the 19 cats that cured with MC was 48 (range 14–93 days).

When the number of days to cure was compared between the groups, there was a significant difference between cats treated with LSO and LSR (P = 0.029) and cats treated with LSO and MC (P = 0.031), but no significant difference between the number of days to cure for cats treated with LSR and MC (P = 0.91).

Source: Newbury, S., Moriello, K. A., Kwochka, K. W., Verbrugge, M. and Thomas, C. (2011), Use of itraconazole and either lime sulphur or Malaseb Concentrate Rinse® to treat shelter cats naturally infected with Microsporum canis: an open field trial. Veterinary Dermatology, 22: 75–79. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-3164.2010.00914.x




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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Patient-specific facemask to facilitate brain biopsymembers
The objective of this pilot study was to describe the application and first preliminary data of a novel MRI and CT compatible patient-specific facemask for stereotactic brain biopsy of intracranial lesions in dogs. Five client-owned dogs presenting for neurological deficits consistent with forebrain disease were included in the study. All dogs had MRI findings consistent with an intracranial lesion. But biopsies in this region are not easy to obtain. Does an individual face mask help?

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