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FDA approves first Insulin drug for diabetic dogs
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Picture: Ā© Bayer Animal Health

The FDA has approved an Insulin drug for diabetic dogs, that will be available in the United States in late summer 2004. The only treatment veterinarians could use before on diabetic dogs was human insulin, which is less compatible with a dogĀ’s metabolic system.

FDA has approved a porcine insulin zinc suspension product as the first drug for treating diabetic dogs. Prior to the development of this product, the only treatment veterinarians could use on diabetic dogs was human insulin, which is less compatible with a dogĀ’s metabolic system. Estimates are that one in every 200 dogs will develop diabetes. The onset usually occurs in dogs aged 7-9 years, and seems to be twice as prevalent in females as in males. The product will be marketed under the trade name Ā“VetsulinĀ” by its developer Intervet, Inc. of Millsboro, Del., and will be available under a veterinarianĀ’s prescription. The treatment will be used to improve the clinical signs of diabetes in dogs such as excessive thirst, excessive urination, excessive appetite, and weight loss despite good appetite. Veterinarians will determine the initial treatment dose based on the dogĀ’s weight, and then will use various tests to adjust the dosage to the optimum level. Maintenance administration of the insulin may be done in the home. Dog owners will be provided instructions on how to treat their dogs at home with the insulin. An information sheet that outlines the benefits and risks of the treatment will also be provided. Among the risks dog owners may face is hypoglycemia (dangerously lowblood sugar) if they accidentally inject themselves with the insulin. The product contains warning statements on the label about this risk as well as others such as the need to prevent eye exposure to the insulin. Vetsulin has already been approved in 20 countries, including the United Kingdom, and should be available in the United States in late summer 2004.

Quelle: http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/news/2004/NEW01060.html, May 4, 2004



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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Reference intervals for blood parameters in Shetland Sheepdogsmembers
Several breeds have physiological peculiarities that induce variations in reference intervals (RIs) compared with the general canine population. Shetland sheepdogs (SSs) are reported to be more predisposed to different diseases (eg, hyperlipidemia, gallbladder mucocele, and hypothyroidism). Consequently, a breedā€specific approach is more often required. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether the RIs of the general canine population could be applied to that of SSs, and to generate breedā€specific RIs, where appropriate.

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