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Update to SARDS (Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome)
Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) is one of the leading causes of currently incurable canine vision loss diagnosed by veterinary ophthalmologists. The disease is one of the nightmares for both owner and veterinarian and is characterized by acute onset of blindness due to loss of photoreceptor function, extinguished electroretinogram with an initially normal appearing ocular fundus, and mydriatic pupils which are slowly responsive to bright white light, unresponsive to red, but responsive to blue light stimulation. This update is very informative!

In addition to blindness, the majority of affected dogs also show systemic abnormalities suggestive of hyperadrenocorticism, such as polyphagia with resulting obesity, polyuria, polydipsia, and a subclinical hepatopathy.

The pathogenesis of SARDS is unknown, but neuroendocrine and autoimmune mechanisms have been suggested.

Therapies that target these disease pathways have been proposed to reverse or prevent further vision loss in SARDS-affected dogs, but these treatments are controversial.

In November 2014, the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists` Vision for Animals Foundation organized and funded a Think Tank to review the current knowledge and recently proposed ideas about disease mechanisms and treatment of SARDS.

These panel discussions resulted in recommendations for future research strategies toward a better understanding of pathogenesis, early diagnosis, and potential therapy for this condition.



Source: Komáromy, A. M., Abrams, K. L., Heckenlively, J. R., Lundy, S. K., Maggs, D. J., Leeth, C. M., MohanKumar, P. S., Petersen-Jones, S. M., Serreze, D. V. and van der Woerdt, A. (2015), Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) – a review and proposed strategies toward a better understanding of pathogenesis, early diagnosis, and therapy. Veterinary Ophthalmology. doi: 10.1111/vop.12291



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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Radioactive iodine uptake in hyperthyroid cats after rh-TSHmembers
Radioactive iodine therapy is considered the treatment of choice for hyperthyroidism in cats, but the availability of this modality is limited by costs and hospitalization requirements. Administration of recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rh‐TSH) to humans with thyroid neoplasia or nodular goiter can increase thyroidal iodine uptake, thereby allowing the use of lower radioactive iodine doses for treatment. Veterinary studies of this subject are limited, and results are conflicting. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of rh‐TSH administration on thyroidal iodine uptake in hyperthyroid cats.

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