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Cutaneous microflora in horses with and without skin diseases
The cutaneous microflora of dogs without skin problems, dogs with seborrhoic diseases or allergic dermatoses is well evaluated. Surprisingly, less is known about the equine cutaneous microflora. This brandnew study from Cornell University gives some interesting new insights: For example, equine hyperkeratotic skin is significantly associated with an increased number of surface bacteria.

A retrospective study using light microscopy was performed to assess the prevalence of surface and follicular bacteria and fungi in skin biopsy specimens from 247 horses with inflammatory dermatoses and from 27 horses with healthy skin.

Cocci were found on the surface of specimens from 23% (95% confidence interval 18%, 29%) and 7% (95% confidence interval, 0%, 19%), respectively, of horses with skin disease and horses with healthy skin.

Of the nine dermatoses with at least 10 cases in our series of horses, bacterial folliculitis had a higher prevalence of surface bacteria (57%; 95% confidence interval 34%, 81%) than the other eight (which all had a prevalence < 30%).

There was a significant association between the prevalence of surface cocci and the extent of epidermal hyperkeratosis.

Cocci were found in the keratin of noninflamed hair follicles in only 2% of the horses with skin disease, and in none of the horses with healthy skin.

Fungal poroconidia were found on the surface of 4% of the horses with skin disease, and on none of the horses with healthy skin. Yeasts were not found.


Source: COOK, CHRISTOPHER P., SCOTT, DANNY W., ERB, HOLLIS N. & MILLER, WILLIAM H. (2005): Bacteria and fungi on the surface and within noninflamed hair follicles of skin biopsy specimens from horses with healthy skin or inflammatory dermatoses. In: Veterinary Dermatology 16 (1), 47-51.




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EQUINE

Specific bioactive collagen peptides (PETAGILE®) in horses with osteoarthritismembers
Horse owners tend to feed various substances and medications to horses suffering from osteoarthritis. The aim of this new study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of specific bioactive collagen peptides (BCP), here administered orally as PETAGILE®, on horses with mild to moderate, naturally occurring osteoarthritis. Data from a two‐centred pilot study were used for the meta‐analysis.

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  • Unexpected cause of haematuria in an Egyptian Arabian stallionmembers
  • First description of hypersplenism in an old miniature ponymembers
  • Endocrinopathies associated with severe hypertriglyceridaemia in horses and poniesmembers
  • Clinical effect of corticosteroids in horses with asthmamembers
  • Severe complications of cheek tooth extraction in a ponymembers
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  • Traumatic coccygeal luxation and distal amputation of the tail of a horsemembers
  • Head computed tomography in equine practicemembers
  • Standing intraoral extractions of cheek teeth in horsesmembers
  • Actinobacillus capsulatus peritonitis and chyloabdomen in a horsemembers
  • Adverse effect of an intrapleural tissue plasminogen activatormembers


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