Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Small Animal Practice /     
 
Cancer is the leading cause of death in dogs and cats
Some years ago, heart diseases and gastric-dilatation/volvulus complex were more common reasons for death in dogs than cancer. But the times are changing: we have better therapies for cardiac diseases and better surgery for gastric volvulus additional to preventive gastropexy now, and dogs and cats nowadays have a longer life span than ever before. Today the oncologists in the USA estimate that almost 50 percent of geriatric dogs and 33 percent of cats will die of cancer.

As the pet population in the United States continues to age, cancer in pet animals is expected to become an even more significant problem in the field of animal health.

The need for new treatments that are more effective and less toxic is widely recognized. Our understanding of the biology of cancer has expanded in recent years and now is shedding light on novel treatment strategies for this problem.

This excellent article gives an update in tumour pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy.


Source: Dr. Anthony Rusk (2005): Cancer: Cases likely will rise in aging animals. In: DVM Newsmagazine Mar 1, 2005.
http://www.dvmnewsmagazine.com/dvm/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=152665


Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

Fluorescein sodium-guided resection of intracranial lesions in dogsmembers
Twenty-two dogs with intracranial lesions were enrolled in this prospective case series. The objectives were to evaluate the safety of an intraoperative fluorescein sodium (FS) injection and elucidate the relationships between the MRI findings, pathological diagnoses, and intraoperative staining characteristics of intracranial lesions in 22 dogs.

  • Ultrasound and clinical findings in cats with urethral obstructionmembers
  • Novel technique to measure plasma lipids in diabetic dogsmembers
  • Prevalence and disease associations in feline thrombocytopeniamembers
  • Optic neuritis in dogs: an updatemembers
  • Brachycephalic airway syndrome - differences between pugs and French bulldogsmembers
  • Prognostic factors in cats with HCMmembers
  • Ureteral Papilla Implantation in Cats Undergoing Renal Transplantationmembers
  • Storage lesion in canine packed erythrocytesmembers
  • Drug-induced infiltrative lung disease with cytarabine and prednisonemembers
  • Laparoscopic-assisted Gastropexy and the Gastrointestinal Transit Time in Dogsmembers
  • Transpalpebral ultrasonographic evaluation and measurement of the optic nerve members
  • Squamous cell carcinoma mimicking orbital myofibroblastic sarcomamembers


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2016 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved