Home
http://www.virbac.fr/ http://www.boehringer-ingelheim.com/ http://www.novartis.com/ http://www.animalhealth.bayerhealthcare.com/
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  WELCOME  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Home  
  Login / Newsletter  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  CONTACTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Classifieds  
  New Products  
  VetCompanies  
  VetSchools  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PROFESSION  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Edutainment  
  VetAgenda  
  Presentations  
  Posters  
  ESAVS  
  Specialisation  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  INSIGHT  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Congress News  
  Picture Galleries  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  PRODUCTS  
vetcontact
Vetrinär
Tiermedizin
  Bayer  
  Boehringer Ing.  
  Novartis  
  Virbac

 
  Simply book for less...  
    

Bovine    Equine    Small Animal Practice    Swine Practice    Articles    Vetjournal    
deutsch english español polski francais
Home / WELCOME / Archiv / Vetjournal /     
 
Rapidly growing Mycobacteria in dogs and cats
Mycobacteria are sometimes isolated in samples from dogs and cats, often taken from chronic nonhealing skin lesions. Which species are affecting dogs and cats most commonly and how are they treated best?

Rapidly growing members of the genus Mycobacterium were most often associated with chronic (2 to 72 months), nonhealing skin lesions of dogs and cats.

Mycobacterium fortuitum (M. fortuitum) was the most commonly isolated mycobacterium obtained from these lesions, although M. chelonae-abscessus and M. flavescens were occasionally encountered.

Isolates were tested in vitro to various antimicrobial agents and found to be susceptible to amikacin (100% of the isolates), cefoxitin (93.8%), ciprofloxacin (75%), clarithromycin (71.4%), doxycycline (28.6%), erythromycin (6.2%), gentamicin (68.8%), kanamycin (75%), minocycline (81.3%), streptomycin (14.3%), tobramycin (43.8%), trimethoprim/sulfonamides (57.1%), and vancomycin (15.4%).


Source: Spencer S. Jang, Dwight C. Hirsh (2002): Rapidly Growing Members of the Genus Mycobacterium Affecting Dogs and Cats. In: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association 38:217-220 (2002)



Tell a friend   |   Print version   |   Send this article

VETJOURNAL

VetAgenda

  • Join the 11th Eurasia Veterinary Conference at the island Zanzibar, Tansania 2018
  • Lab in Practice - Clinical Pathology
  • European Master of Small Animal Veterinary Medicine
  • SEVC 2014
  • ESAVS - Neuropathology & MRI
  • CongressMed 2014
  • ACVIM 2014
  • VetContact
  • WVEPAH Courses
  • Optimizing MRI results of the spinemembers
  • Garfield is turning back the clock


  • [ Home ] [ About ] [ Contact / Request ][ Disclaimer ]

    Copyright © 2001-2016 VetContact GmbH
    All rights reserved