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Spontaneous gastroduodenal perforations - clinical signs
Which signs would you exspect in an animal with spontaneous gastroduodenal perforation? Shock and anemia? The majority of the 23 animals included in this study did not show shock symptoms but peritonitis and/or acute abdomen, and Rottweilers seem to be an overrespresented breed. A very informative study!

The records of 23 dogs and cats diagnosed with spontaneous gastroduodenal perforation (GDP) were retrospectively reviewed.

Survival was 63% in dogs and 14% in cats. Rottweilers <5 years of age were overrepresented.

Clinical evidence of gastrointestinal bleeding was common in dogs but not in cats.

Shock was an uncommon presenting condition in dogs and was not closely linked to outcome.

In fact, progression of an ulcerating lesion to GDP was not associated with marked changes in symptoms exhibited by many patients in this study.

Most GDPs were associated with histopathological evidence of subacute or chronic peritoneal reaction at the time of diagnosis.

This suggests that diagnostic methods employed lacked sensitivity in identifying early perforating lesions, and that dramatic signs of acute abdomen following gastroduodenal perforation may not be as common as was previously thought.



Source: Laura E. Hinton, Mary A. McLoughlin, Susan E. Johnson, Steven E. Weisbrode (2002): Spontaneous Gastroduodenal Perforation in 16 Dogs and Seven Cats (1982–1999). In: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association 38:176-187 (2002)




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SMALL ANIMAL PRACTICE

RET-He to diagnose iron-deficient erythropoiesis in dogsmembers
Reticulocyte hemoglobin content provided by the Siemens ADVIA (CHr) is an established marker of iron deficiency. The IDEXX ProCyte Dx hematology analyzer now provides a similar variable, reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent (RET-He).
The objectives of this study were to evaluate RET-He and its diagnostic utility in dogs, and to calculate a cutoff value for diagnosing iron-deficient erythropoiesis (IDE).

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