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Sudden blindness in a dog (case report)
A male mixed breed dog of unknown age was presented with sudden onset of blindness and a slightly exophthalmic right eye. Ophthalmoscopically, a spherical, pinkish mass protruding from the region of the optic disc into the vitreous was seen in the right eye. How would you proceed?

Ultrasound and computer tomography demonstrated an extension of the mass into the right retrobulbar space, continuing intracranially to the optic chiasm. Cytologic findings, obtained by ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration from the retrobulbar space, were consistent with myxosarcoma. On the basis of these findings of a well-delineated mass in the brain stem area, irradiation was planned as the therapy of choice. The dog was treated under general anesthesia using a proton beam at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI, Villigen, Switzerland). A curative protocol (56 Gy in 16 fractions over 4 weeks, 3.5 Gy/fraction) was used. Twenty-seven days post radiation therapy the dog was euthanized, as clinical symptoms progressed. Enlargement of the intracranial tumor was seen on a CT study repeated on the day of euthanasia. A gross pathologic and histologic examination were performed and confirmed the diagnosis of a myxosarcoma involving the eye, retrobulbar space of the right side, and the optic chiasm. Post-mortem examination failed to identify any abnormalities or metastases elsewhere in the body.

Source: Richter, M., Stankeova, S., Hauser, B., Scharf, G., Spiess, B.M. (2003): Myxosarcoma in the eye and brain in a dog. In: Veterinary Ophthalmology 6 (3), pp 183-189.
www.blackwell-synergy.com/links/doi: 10.1046/
j.1463-5224.2003.00289.x









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